amy denmeade RSS

mostly media and technology issues that i'm thinking about.. but also bits and pieces that just catch my eye.

you can also follow my wanderings on twitter.

Archive

Jul
28th
Mon
permalink
There are two kinds of pity. One, the weak-minded, sentimental sort, is really just the heart’s impatience to rid itself as quickly as possible of the painful experience of being moved by another person’s suffering. It is not a case of real sympathy, of feeling with the sufferer, but a way of defending yourself against someone else’s pain. The other kind, the only one that counts, is unsentimental but creative. It knows its own mind, and is determined to stand by the sufferer, to the last of its strength and even beyond.
— The epigraph of Stefan Zweig’s Beware of Pity (translation by Anthea Bell, 2013 edition).  This book is next on my reading list. 
Comments (View)
permalink

Recently read (and enjoyed)..

Flash Boys, by Michael Lewis

My Salinger Year, a memoir by Joanna Rakoff

All My Puny Sorrows, by Miriam Toews

The Lie, by Hesh Kestin

Your Fathers, Where Are They? And The Prophets, Do They Live Forever?, by Dave Eggers

Comments (View)
Jul
25th
Fri
permalink

Seven to ten years for crimes we did not commit. But our struggle is not over. Not by a long shot. We committed no crime and the world seems to have understood this. So now, we must focus on the next stage in the judicial battle to clear our name and win back our freedom.

We will appeal. We still remain strong and confident, determined to fight for our cause.

At least part of our strength comes from the understanding that this isn’t just about those wrongly convicted in our case. This is about press freedom, about freedom of speech not just in Egypt but globally.

Reflections on the verdict (pdf), by journalists Peter Greste and Baher Mohammed.

via Foreign Correspondent (ABC TV) 

Comments (View)
Jul
21st
Mon
permalink
The truth is, griping can be fun, and as rapidly ageing gentlemen, seasoned observers of the human comedy, wise gray heads who have seen it all and are surprised by nothing, I feel it is our duty to gripe and scold, to attack the hypocrisies, injustices, and stupidities of the world we live in. Let the young roll their eyes when we speak. Let the not so young ignore what we say. We must carry on with utmost vigilance, scorned prophets crying into the wilderness - for just because we know we are fighting a losing battle, that doesn’t mean we should abandon the fight.
From a letter written by Paul Auster, part of a published exchange between Auster and writer/friend J.M. Coetzee, Here and Now (2013)
Comments (View)
permalink
I am dismayed at the prospect of the library of the future. I am sure that feeling is shared by many. But, aside from sentiment, what can justify such dismay? A hunger for the real in a world of shadows? Books are not real, not in any important sense. The very letters on the page are signs, images of sounds, which are images of ideas. The fact that what we call a book can be picked up in one’s hands, has a smell and a feel of its own, is an accident of its production with no relevance to what the book conveys
— From a letter written by J.M. Coetzee, part of a published exchange between Coetzee and writer/friend Paul Auster, Here and Now (2013)
Comments (View)
Jul
17th
Thu
permalink
Comments (View)
permalink

Short film on Maira Kalman, part of director Gael Towey’s Portraits in Creativity series

Found via Swissmiss 

Comments (View)
Jul
15th
Tue
permalink
The ‘BIG Maze’ by the Bjarke Ingels Group, via IGNANT

The ‘BIG Maze’ by the Bjarke Ingels Group, via IGNANT

Comments (View)
Jul
14th
Mon
permalink
For this is the truth that we are now facing. For all of its democratizing power, the Internet, in its current form, has simply replaced the old boss with a new boss. And these new bosses have market power that, in time, will be vastly larger than that of the old boss.
— Interesting post (and comments) by venture capitalist Fred Wilson, Platform Monopolies, via AVC 
Comments (View)
Jul
11th
Fri
permalink
Technology is not destiny
— From The Second Machine Age by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, both from MIT. Often when I read books about technology and business I feel uncomfortable with the sense of inevitability conveyed. This book is an optimistic one but does recognise the complexity of the issues it examines. 
Comments (View)